Years before I even knew about the Internet, I covered politics in my hometown, Milwaukee. Starting at my college paper, the UWM Post, and continuing through a series of local alternative weeklies. It’s been awhile since I’ve been on that beat, but a few weeks ago, I got the bug again.

Representative Robyn Vining, from her Wisconsin state assembly page.

 

 

When a hitherto-unknown politician (at least unknown to me) started running ads about her campaign for state assembly, I got curious. This week, I finally silenced the voices in my head by publishing “Who is Robyn Vining? Why is she running ads on TV?”

The story tells you a little bit about her, and some rampant speculation about her reasons for spending campaign money on TV ads, a medium where many more people will see her ads than can vote for her.

FYI: The story isn’t behind a paywall; anyone can read it.

Let me know what you think of this piece, either in the Comments below or on Medium itself. Should I do more of this? If you happen to be an editor and like it, drop me a line. We should probably talk about other things to write about. ๐Ÿ˜‰

 

GENEVA, March 4, 2019 — Thirty years ago, a young computer expert working at CERN combined ideas about accessing information with a desire for broad

Source: CERN Highlights the 30-Year Anniversary of the Invention of the Internet

Looking forward to this event next week. I wonder if it will be online? ๐Ÿ˜Ž

On the morning of 12 March, the Web@30 event at CERN will kick off celebrations around the world. Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Robert Cailliau and other Web pioneers and experts will share their views on the challenges and opportunities brought by the Web.

I posted a Privacy Policy on the site.

Yes, I realize it’s a little late for my European visitors. You may have concerns under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). I hope that the strength of the policy compensates for its delay. Better late than never.

I based the policy on guidance from Automattic and plugin developers. Many thanks for the customized Privacy Guide they provided.

There is a lot of legal language, as you might expect. But here’s the short, plain description of MichaelMcCallister.com’s privacy policy.

  • Above all, I created this website for communication between me, my readers, and past, present, and future colleagues and editors.
  • Aside from your public comments on posts like this, and private submissions via my contact form, I won’t keep anything you might do here.
  • I am interested in learning what topics interest visitors here, and allow Google Analytics to track and report anonymous results to me.
  • I have no interest in anything else you do on the Internet.
  • Most importantly, I have no intention of ever turning my visitors into my product.ย That will never change.

If you have questions or concerns about anything in the privacy policy, comment on this post, or write privacy@michaelmccallister.com. I will read it and respond quickly.

Thanks for visiting!

Respectfully,

Michael McCallister